Tuesday, January 17, 2017
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Index Apocrypha Books

Apocrypha books

From Greek apokryptein, "to hide away"), in biblical literature, works outside an accepted canon of scripture. The history of the term's usage indicates that it referred to a body of esoteric writings that were at first prized, later tolerated, and finally excluded. In its broadest sense apocrypha has come to mean any writings of dubious authority.

The first set are books which are included in some version of the canonical Bible, but which have been excluded at one time or another, for textual or doctrinal issues. These are called 'Deuterocanonical', which means 'books added to the canon.'

The second set are other apocryphal texts which have not been canonized, but which nevertheless shed light on the Bible and its history.

There are several levels of dubiety within the general concept of apocryphal works in Judeo-Christian biblical writings.

Apocrypha per se are outside the canon, not considered divinely inspired but regarded as worthy of study by the faithful.

At the time when Greek was the common spoken language in the Mediterranean region, the Old Testament "the Hebrew Bible" was incomprehensible to most of the population. For this reason, Jewish scholars produced the Septuagint, a translation of the Old Testament books from various Hebrew texts, along with fragments in Aramaic, into Greek. That version incorporated a number of works that later, non-Hellenistic Jewish scholarship at the Council of Jamnia (90 AD) identified as being outside the authentic Hebrew canon. The Talmud separates these works as Sefarim Hizonim (Extraneous Books).

The Septuagint was an important basis for St. Jerome's translation of the Old Testament into Latin for the Vulgate Bible; and, although he had doubts about the authenticity of some of the apocryphal works that it contained (he was the first to employ the word apocrypha in the sense of "noncanonical"), he was overruled, and most of them were included in the Vulgate. On April 8, 1546, the Council of Trent declared the canonicity of nearly the entire Vulgate, excluding only the Third and Fourth Books of Macabees, the Prayer of Manasseh, Psalm 151, and the First and Second Books of Esdras. Eastern Christendom, meanwhile, had accepted some of the Old Testament apocrypha Tobit, Judith, the Wisdom of Solomon, and Ecclesiasticus (Wisdom of Jesus the Son of Sirach) but rejected the rest.

The other apocryphal writings, canonical only to Roman Catholicism, with an exception or two, include the Book of Baruch (a prophet) and the Letter of Jeremiah (often the sixth chapter of Baruch); the First and Second Books of Macabees; several stories from Daniel, namely, the Song of the Three, Susanna, and Bel and the Dragon; and extensive portions of the Book of Esther.

In addition to apocryphal works, the New Testament includes a number of works and fragments that are described by a second meaning of the term Deuterocanonical: "added later." The Letter to the Hebrews attributed to Paul, who died before it was written, is one of these; others are the letters of James, Peter (II), John (II and III), and Jude, and the Revelation to John. Fragments include Mark 16:9-20, Luke 22:43-44, and John 7:53 and 8:1-11. All are included in the Roman canon and are accepted by the Eastern Church and most Protestant churches.

At the Synod of Dordrecht (The Netherlands), held in 1618-1619, the Protestants declared all Apocrypha and Pseudepigrapha books not canonical as part of the "original" Bible. At this Synod the King James Version of the Bible was established, in The Netherlands called "Statenvertaling".

Deuterocanonical

The Apocrypha refer to texts which are left out of officially sanctioned versions ('canon') of the Bible. The term means 'things hidden away,' which implies secret or esoteric literature. However, none of these texts were ever considered secret.

In some Protestant Bibles, they are placed between the New and Old Testament. In the Roman Catholic Bibles the books are interspersed with the rest of the text. In this case they are also called 'Deuterocanonical', which means 'books added to the canon'. The books on this page are all Deuterocanonical.

Jerome rejected the Deuterocanonical books when he was translating the Bible into Latin circa 450 CE. This was because no Hebrew version of these texts could be found, even though they were present in the Greek Old Testament (the Septuagint). However, they eventually were accepted by the Church, and remained part of the Bible. Protestants rejected these books during the Reformation as lacking divine authority. They either excised them completely or placed them in a third section of the Bible. The Roman Catholic Council of Trent, on the other hand, declared in 1546 that the Deuterocanonical books were indeed divine.

Deuterocanonical Apocrypha



Chapter Index

First Book of Esdras
Second Book of Esdras
Tobit or Tobias
Judith
Additions to Esther
Wisdom of Solomon
Baruch
Epistle of Jeremiah
Book of Susanna
The Book of Bel and the Dragon
Prayer of Manasseh
First Book of Macabees
Second Book of Macabees
Sirach
Prayer of Azariah

With one exception, all of these books are considered 'Old Testament'. The apocryphal New Testament 'Letter of Paul to the Laodiceans', was once incorporated in many versions of the Bible. However Laodiceans is now considered just a pastiche of other Epistles, and is omitted from contemporary Bibles.

Paul to the Laodiceans

Non-Deuterocanonical

There are many other apocryphal books, which do not fall into the 'Deuterocanonical' category, such as the many additional New Testament Gospels, and the apocalyptic book of Enoch.

The Gospel of Thomas

and many others

The book of Enoch and others you can find in my Pseudepigrapha section.

Baruch

Baruch

chapter 1

1:1 And these are the words of the book, which Baruch the son of Nerias, the son of Maasias, the son of Sedecias, the son of Asadias, the son of Chelcias, wrote in Babylon,
1:2 In the fifth year, and in the seventh day of the month, what time as the Chaldeans took Jerusalem, and burnt it with fire.
1:3 And Baruch did read the words of this book in the hearing of Jechonias the son of Joachim king of Juda, and in the ears of all the people that came to hear the book,
1:4 And in the hearing of the nobles, and of the king's sons, and in the hearing of the elders, and of all the people, from the lowest unto the highest, even of all them that dwelt at Babylon by the river Sud.
1:5 Whereupon they wept, fasted, and prayed before the Lord.
1:6 They made also a collection of money according to every man's power:
1:7 And they sent it to Jerusalem unto Joachim the high priest, the son of Chelcias, son of Salom, and to the priests, and to all the people which were found with him at Jerusalem,
1:8 At the same time when he received the vessels of the house of the Lord, that were carried out of the temple, to return them into the land of Juda, the tenth day of the month Sivan, namely, silver vessels, which Sedecias the son of Josias king of Jada had made,
1:9 After that Nabuchodonosor king of Babylon had carried away Jechonias, and the princes, and the captives, and the mighty men, and the people of the land, from Jerusalem, and brought them unto Babylon.
1:10 And they said, Behold, we have sent you money to buy you burnt offerings, and sin offerings, and incense, and prepare ye manna, and offer upon the altar of the Lord our God;
1:11 And pray for the life of Nabuchodonosor king of Babylon, and for the life of Balthasar his son, that their days may be upon earth as the days of heaven:
1:12 And the Lord will give us strength, and lighten our eyes, and we shall live under the shadow of Nabuchodonosor king of Babylon, and under the shadow of Balthasar his son, and we shall serve them many days, and find favour in their sight.
1:13 Pray for us also unto the Lord our God, for we have sinned against the Lord our God; and unto this day the fury of the Lord and his wrath is not turned from us.
1:14 And ye shall read this book which we have sent unto you, to make confession in the house of the Lord, upon the feasts and solemn days.
1:15 And ye shall say, To the Lord our God belongeth righteousness, but unto us the confusion of faces, as it is come to pass this day, unto them of Juda, and to the inhabitants of Jerusalem,
1:16 And to our kings, and to our princes, and to our priests, and to our prophets, and to our fathers:
1:17 For we have sinned before the Lord,
1:18 And disobeyed him, and have not hearkened unto the voice of the Lord our God, to walk in the commandments that he gave us openly:
1:19 Since the day that the Lord brought our forefathers out of the land of Egypt, unto this present day, we have been disobedient unto the Lord our God, and we have been negligent in not hearing his voice.
1:20 Wherefore the evils cleaved unto us, and the curse, which the Lord appointed by Moses his servant at the time that he brought our fathers out of the land of Egypt, to give us a land that floweth with milk and honey, like as it is to see this day.
1:21 Nevertheless we have not hearkened unto the voice of the Lord our God, according unto all the words of the prophets, whom he sent unto us:
1:22 But every man followed the imagination of his own wicked heart, to serve strange gods, and to do evil in the sight of the Lord our God.

chapter 2

2:1 Therefore the Lord hath made good his word, which he pronounced against us, and against our judges that judged Israel, and against our kings, and against our princes, and against the men of Israel and Juda,
2:2 To bring upon us great plagues, such as never happened under the whole heaven, as it came to pass in Jerusalem, according to the things that were written in the law of Moses;
2:3 That a man should eat the flesh of his own son, and the flesh of his own daughter.
2:4 Moreover he hath delivered them to be in subjection to all the kingdoms that are round about us, to be as a reproach and desolation among all the people round about, where the Lord hath scattered them.
2:5 Thus we were cast down, and not exalted, because we have sinned against the Lord our God, and have not been obedient unto his voice.
2:6 To the Lord our God appertaineth righteousness: but unto us and to our fathers open shame, as appeareth this day.
2:7 For all these plagues are come upon us, which the Lord hath pronounced against us
2:8 Yet have we not prayed before the Lord, that we might turn every one from the imaginations of his wicked heart.
2:9 Wherefore the Lord watched over us for evil, and the Lord hath brought it upon us: for the Lord is righteous in all his works which he hath commanded us.
2:10 Yet we have not hearkened unto his voice, to walk in the commandments of the Lord, that he hath set before us.
2:11 And now, O Lord God of Israel, that hast brought thy people out of the land of Egypt with a mighty hand, and high arm, and with signs, and with wonders, and with great power, and hast gotten thyself a name, as appeareth this day:
2:12 O Lord our God, we have sinned, we have done ungodly, we have dealt unrighteously in all thine ordinances.
2:13 Let thy wrath turn from us: for we are but a few left among the heathen, where thou hast scattered us.
2:14 Hear our prayers, O Lord, and our petitions, and deliver us for thine own sake, and give us favour in the sight of them which have led us away:
2:15 That all the earth may know that thou art the Lord our God, because Israel and his posterity is called by thy name.
2:16 O Lord, look down from thine holy house, and consider us: bow down thine ear, O Lord, to hear us.
2:17 Open thine eyes, and behold; for the dead that are in the graves, whose souls are taken from their bodies, will give unto the Lord neither praise nor righteousness:
2:18 But the soul that is greatly vexed, which goeth stooping and feeble, and the eyes that fail, and the hungry soul, will give thee praise and righteousness, O Lord.
2:19 Therefore we do not make our humble supplication before thee, O Lord our God, for the righteousness of our fathers, and of our kings.
2:20 For thou hast sent out thy wrath and indignation upon us, as thou hast spoken by thy servants the prophets, saying,
2:21 Thus saith the Lord, Bow down your shoulders to serve the king of Babylon: so shall ye remain in the land that I gave unto your fathers.
2:22 But if ye will not hear the voice of the Lord, to serve the king of Babylon,
2:23 I will cause to cease out of the cites of Judah, and from without Jerusalem, the voice of mirth, and the voice of joy, the voice of the bridegroom, and the voice of the bride: and the whole land shall be desolate of inhabitants.
2:24 But we would not hearken unto thy voice, to serve the king of Babylon: therefore hast thou made good the words that thou spakest by thy servants the prophets, namely, that the bones of our kings, and the bones of our fathers, should be taken out of their place.
2:25 And, lo, they are cast out to the heat of the day, and to the frost of the night, and they died in great miseries by famine, by sword, and by pestilence.
2:26 And the house which is called by thy name hast thou laid waste, as it is to be seen this day, for the wickedness of the house of Israel and the house of Juda.
2:27 O Lord our God, thou hast dealt with us after all thy goodness, and according to all that great mercy of thine,
2:28 As thou spakest by thy servant Moses in the day when thou didst command him to write the law before the children of Israel, saying,
2:29 If ye will not hear my voice, surely this very great multitude shall be turned into a small number among the nations, where I will scatter them.
2:30 For I knew that they would not hear me, because it is a stiffnecked people: but in the land of their captivities they shall remember themselves.
2:31 And shall know that I am the Lord their God: for I will give them an heart, and ears to hear:
2:32 And they shall praise me in the land of their captivity, and think upon my name,
2:33 And return from their stiff neck, and from their wicked deeds: for they shall remember the way of their fathers, which sinned before the Lord.
2:34 And I will bring them again into the land which I promised with an oath unto their fathers, Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, and they shall be lords of it: and I will increase them, and they shall not be diminished.
2:35 And I will make an everlasting covenant with them to be their God, and they shall be my people: and I will no more drive my people of Israel out of the land that I have given them.

chapter 3

3:1 O Lord Almighty, God of Israel, the soul in anguish the troubled spirit, crieth unto thee.
3:2 Hear, O Lord, and have mercy; ar thou art merciful: and have pity upon us, because we have sinned before thee.
3:3 For thou endurest for ever, and we perish utterly.
3:4 O Lord Almighty, thou God of Israel, hear now the prayers of the dead Israelites, and of their children, which have sinned before thee, and not hearkened unto the voice of thee their God: for the which cause these plagues cleave unto us.
3:5 Remember not the iniquities of our forefathers: but think upon thy power and thy name now at this time.
3:6 For thou art the Lord our God, and thee, O Lord, will we praise.
3:7 And for this cause thou hast put thy fear in our hearts, to the intent that we should call upon thy name, and praise thee in our captivity: for we have called to mind all the iniquity of our forefathers, that sinned before thee.
3:8 Behold, we are yet this day in our captivity, where thou hast scattered us, for a reproach and a curse, and to be subject to payments, according to all the iniquities of our fathers, which departed from the Lord our God.
3:9 Hear, Israel, the commandments of life: give ear to understand wisdom.
3:10 How happeneth it Israel, that thou art in thine enemies' land, that thou art waxen old in a strange country, that thou art defiled with the dead,
3:11 That thou art counted with them that go down into the grave?
3:12 Thou hast forsaken the fountain of wisdom.
3:13 For if thou hadst walked in the way of God, thou shouldest have dwelled in peace for ever.
3:14 Learn where is wisdom, where is strength, where is understanding; that thou mayest know also where is length of days, and life, where is the light of the eyes, and peace.
3:15 Who hath found out her place? or who hath come into her treasures ?
3:16 Where are the princes of the heathen become, and such as ruled the beasts upon the earth;
3:17 They that had their pastime with the fowls of the air, and they that hoarded up silver and gold, wherein men trust, and made no end of their getting?
3:18 For they that wrought in silver, and were so careful, and whose works are unsearchable,
3:19 They are vanished and gone down to the grave, and others are come up in their steads.
3:20 Young men have seen light, and dwelt upon the earth: but the way of knowledge have they not known,
3:21 Nor understood the paths thereof, nor laid hold of it: their children were far off from that way.
3:22 It hath not been heard of in Chanaan, neither hath it been seen in Theman.
3:23 The Agarenes that seek wisdom upon earth, the merchants of Meran and of Theman, the authors of fables, and searchers out of understanding; none of these have known the way of wisdom, or remember her paths.
3:24 O Israel, how great is the house of God! and how large is the place of his possession!
3:25 Great, and hath none end; high, and unmeasurable.
3:26 There were the giants famous from the beginning, that were of so great stature, and so expert in war.
3:27 Those did not the Lord choose, neither gave he the way of knowledge unto them:
3:28 But they were destroyed, because they had no wisdom, and perished through their own foolishness.
3:29 Who hath gone up into heaven, and taken her, and brought her down from the clouds?
3:30 Who hath gone over the sea, and found her, and will bring her for pure gold?
3:31 No man knoweth her way, nor thinketh of her path.
3:32 But he that knoweth all things knoweth her, and hath found her out with his understanding: he that prepared the earth for evermore hath filled it with fourfooted beasts:
3:33 He that sendeth forth light, and it goeth, calleth it again, and it obeyeth him with fear.
3:34 The stars shined in their watches, and rejoiced: when he calleth them, they say, Here we be; and so with cheerfulness they shewed light unto him that made them.
3:35 This is our God, and there shall none other be accounted of in comparison of him
3:36 He hath found out all the way of knowledge, and hath given it unto Jacob his servant, and to Israel his beloved.
3:37 Afterward did he shew himself upon earth, and conversed with men.

chapter 4

4:1 This is the book of the commandments of God, and the law that endureth for ever: all they that keep it shall come to life; but such as leave it shall die.
4:2 Turn thee, O Jacob, and take hold of it: walk in the presence of the light thereof, that thou mayest be illuminated.
4:3 Give not thine honour to another, nor the things that are profitable unto thee to a strange nation.
4:4 O Israel, happy are we: for things that are pleasing to God are made known unto us.
4:5 Be of good cheer, my people, the memorial of Israel.
4:6 Ye were sold to the nations, not for [your] destruction: but because ye moved God to wrath, ye were delivered unto the enemies.
4:7 For ye provoked him that made you by sacrificing unto devils, and not to God.
4:8 Ye have forgotten the everlasting God, that brought you up; and ye have grieved Jerusalem, that nursed you.
4:9 For when she saw the wrath of God coming upon you, she said, Hearken, O ye that dwell about Sion: God hath brought upon me great mourning;
4:10 For I saw the captivity of my sons and daughters, which the Everlasting brought upon them.
4:11 With joy did I nourish them; but sent them away with weeping and mourning.
4:12 Let no man rejoice over me, a widow, and forsaken of many, who for the sins of my children am left desolate; because they departed from the law of God.
4:13 They knew not his statutes, nor walked in the ways of his commandments, nor trod in the paths of discipline in his righteousness.
4:14 Let them that dwell about Sion come, and remember ye the captivity of my sons and daughters, which the Everlasting hath brought upon them.
4:15 For he hath brought a nation upon them from far, a shameless nation, and of a strange language, who neither reverenced old man, nor pitied child.
4:16 These have carried away the dear beloved children of the widow, and left her that was alone desolate without daughters.
4:17 But what can I help you?
4:18 For he that brought these plagues upon you will deliver you from the hands of your enemies.
4:19 Go your way, O my children, go your way: for I am left desolate.
4:20 I have put off the clothing of peace, and put upon me the sackcloth of my prayer: I will cry unto the Everlasting in my days.
4:21 Be of good cheer, O my children, cry unto the Lord, and he will deliver you from the power and hand of the enemies.
4:22 For my hope is in the Everlasting, that he will save you; and joy is come unto me from the Holy One, because of the mercy which shall soon come unto you from the Everlasting our Saviour.
4:23 For I sent you out with mourning and weeping: but God will give you to me again with joy and gladness for ever.
4:24 Like as now the neighbours of Sion have seen your captivity: so shall they see shortly your salvation from our God which shall come upon you with great glory, and brightness of the Everlasting.
4:25 My children, suffer patiently the wrath that is come upon you from God: for thine enemy hath persecuted thee; but shortly thou shalt see his destruction, and shalt tread upon his neck.
4:26 My delicate ones have gone rough ways, and were taken away as a flock caught of the enemies.
4:27 Be of good comfort, O my children, and cry unto God: for ye shall be remembered of him that brought these things upon you.
4:28 For as it was your mind to go astray from God: so, being returned, seek him ten times more.
4:29 For he that hath brought these plagues upon you shall bring you everlasting joy with your salvation.
4:30 Take a good heart, O Jerusalem: for he that gave thee that name will comfort thee.
4:31 Miserable are they that afflicted thee, and rejoiced at thy fall.
4:32 Miserable are the cities which thy children served: miserable is she that received thy sons.
4:33 For as she rejoiced at thy ruin, and was glad of thy fall: so shall she be grieved for her own desolation.
4:34 For I will take away the rejoicing of her great multitude, and her pride shall be turned into mourning.
4:35 For fire shall come upon her from the Everlasting, long to endure; and she shall be inhabited of devils for a great time.
4:36 O Jerusalem, look about thee toward the east, and behold the joy that cometh unto thee from God.
4:37 Lo, thy sons come, whom thou sentest away, they come gathered together from the east to the west by the word of the Holy One, rejoicing in the glory of God.

chapter 5

5:1 Put off, O Jerusalem, the garment of mourning and affliction, and put on the comeliness of the glory that cometh from God for ever.
5:2 Cast about thee a double garment of the righteousness which cometh from God; and set a diadem on thine head of the glory of the Everlasting.
5:3 For God will shew thy brightness unto every country under heaven.
5:4 For thy name shall be called of God for ever The peace of righteousness, and The glory of God's worship.
5:5 Arise, O Jerusalem, and stand on high, and look about toward the east, and behold thy children gathered from the west unto the east by the word of the Holy One, rejoicing in the remembrance of God.
5:6 For they departed from thee on foot, and were led away of their enemies: but God bringeth them unto thee exalted with glory, as children of the kingdom.
5:7 For God hath appointed that every high hill, and banks of long continuance, should be cast down, and valleys filled up, to make even the ground, that Israel may go safely in the glory of God,
5:8 Moreover even the woods and every sweetsmelling tree shall overshadow Israel by the commandment of God.
5:9 For God shall lead Israel with joy in the light of his glory with the mercy and righteousness that cometh from him.

Epistle of Jeremiah

Epistle of Jeremiah

A copy of an epistle, which Jeremy sent unto them which were to be led captives into Babylon by the king of the Babylonians, to certify them, as it was commanded him of God.

Chapter 6

6:1 A copy of an epistle, which Jeremy sent unto them which were to be led captives into Babylon by the king of the Babylonians, to certify them, as it was commanded him of God.
6:2 Because of the sins which ye have committed before God, ye shall be led away captives into Babylon by Nabuchodonosor king of the Babylonians.
6:3 So when ye be come unto Babylon, ye shall remain there many years, and for a long season, namely, seven generations: and after that I will bring you away peaceably from thence.
6:4 Now shall ye see in Babylon gods of silver, and of gold, and of wood, borne upon shoulders, which cause the nations to fear.
6:5 Beware therefore that ye in no wise be like to strangers, neither be ye and of them, when ye see the multitude before them and behind them, worshipping them.
6:6 But say ye in your hearts, O Lord, we must worship thee.
6:7 For mine angel is with you, and I myself caring for your souls.
6:8 As for their tongue, it is polished by the workman, and they themselves are gilded and laid over with silver; yet are they but false, and cannot speak.
6:9 And taking gold, as it were for a virgin that loveth to go gay, they make crowns for the heads of their gods.
6:10 Sometimes also the priests convey from their gods gold and silver, and bestow it upon themselves.
6:11 Yea, they will give thereof to the common harlots, and deck them as men with garments, [being] gods of silver, and gods of gold, and wood.
6:12 Yet cannot these gods save themselves from rust and moth, though they be covered with purple raiment.
6:13 They wipe their faces because of the dust of the temple, when there is much upon them.
6:14 And he that cannot put to death one that offendeth him holdeth a sceptre, as though he were a judge of the country.
6:15 He hath also in his right hand a dagger and an ax: but cannot deliver himself from war and thieves.
6:16 Whereby they are known not to be gods: therefore fear them not.
6:17 For like as a vessel that a man useth is nothing worth when it is broken; even so it is with their gods: when they be set up in the temple, their eyes be full of dust through the feet of them that come in.
6:18 And as the doors are made sure on every side upon him that offendeth the king, as being committed to suffer death: even so the priests make fast their temples with doors, with locks, and bars, lest their gods be spoiled with robbers.
6:19 They light them candles, yea, more than for themselves, whereof they cannot see one.
6:20 They are as one of the beams of the temple, yet they say their hearts are gnawed upon by things creeping out of the earth; and when they eat them and their clothes, they feel it not.
6:21 Their faces are blacked through the smoke that cometh out of the temple.
6:22 Upon their bodies and heads sit bats, swallows, and birds, and the cats also.
6:23 By this ye may know that they are no gods: therefore fear them not.
6:24 Notwithstanding the gold that is about them to make them beautiful, except they wipe off the rust, they will not shine: for neither when they were molten did they feel it.
6:25 The things wherein there is no breath are bought for a most high price.
6:26 They are borne upon shoulders, having no feet whereby they declare unto men that they be nothing worth.
6:27 They also that serve them are ashamed: for if they fall to the ground at any time, they cannot rise up again of themselves: neither, if one set them upright, can they move of themselves: neither, if they be bowed down, can they make themselves straight: but they set gifts before them as unto dead men.
6:28 As for the things that are sacrificed unto them, their priests sell and abuse; in like manner their wives lay up part thereof in salt; but unto the poor and impotent they give nothing of it.
6:29 Menstruous women and women in childbed eat their sacrifices: by these things ye may know that they are no gods: fear them not.
6:30 For how can they be called gods? because women set meat before the gods of silver, gold, and wood.
6:31 And the priests sit in their temples, having their clothes rent, and their heads and beards shaven, and nothing upon their heads.
6:32 They roar and cry before their gods, as men do at the feast when one is dead.
6:33 The priests also take off their garments, and clothe their wives and children.
6:34 Whether it be evil that one doeth unto them, or good, they are not able to recompense it: they can neither set up a king, nor put him down.
6:35 In like manner, they can neither give riches nor money: though a man make a vow unto them, and keep it not, they will not require it.
6:36 They can save no man from death, neither deliver the weak from the mighty.
6:37 They cannot restore a blind man to his sight, nor help any man in his distress.
6:38 They can shew no mercy to the widow, nor do good to the fatherless.
6:39 Their gods of wood, and which are overlaid with gold and silver, are like the stones that be hewn out of the mountain: they that worship them shall be confounded.
6:40 How should a man then think and say that they are gods, when even the Chaldeans themselves dishonour them?
6:41 Who if they shall see one dumb that cannot speak, they bring him, and intreat Bel that he may speak, as though he were able to understand.
6:42 Yet they cannot understand this themselves, and leave them: for they have no knowledge.
6:43 The women also with cords about them, sitting in the ways, burn bran for perfume: but if any of them, drawn by some that passeth by, lie with him, she reproacheth her fellow, that she was not thought as worthy as herself, nor her cord broken.
6:44 Whatsoever is done among them is false: how may it then be thought or said that they are gods?
6:45 They are made of carpenters and goldsmiths: they can be nothing else than the workmen will have them to be.
6:46 And they themselves that made them can never continue long; how should then the things that are made of them be gods?
6:47 For they left lies and reproaches to them that come after.
6:48 For when there cometh any war or plague upon them, the priests consult with themselves, where they may be hidden with them.
6:49 How then cannot men perceive that they be no gods, which can neither save themselves from war, nor from plague?
6:50 For seeing they be but of wood, and overlaid with silver and gold, it shall be known hereafter that they are false:
6:51 And it shall manifestly appear to all nations and kings that they are no gods, but the works of men's hands, and that there is no work of God in them.
6:52 Who then may not know that they are no gods?
6:53 For neither can they set up a king in the land, nor give rain unto men.
6:54 Neither can they judge their own cause, nor redress a wrong, being unable: for they are as crows between heaven and earth.
6:55 Whereupon when fire falleth upon the house of gods of wood, or laid over with gold or silver, their priests will flee away, and escape; but they themselves shall be burned asunder like beams.
6:56 Moreover they cannot withstand any king or enemies: how can it then be thought or said that they be gods?
6:57 Neither are those gods of wood, and laid over with silver or gold, able to escape either from thieves or robbers.
6:58 Whose gold, and silver, and garments wherewith they are clothed, they that are strong take, and go away withal: neither are they able to help themselves.
6:59 Therefore it is better to be a king that sheweth his power, or else a profitable vessel in an house, which the owner shall have use of, than such false gods; or to be a door in an house, to keep such things therein, than such false gods. or a pillar of wood in a a palace, than such false gods.
6:60 For sun, moon, and stars, being bright and sent to do their offices, are obedient.
6:61 In like manner the lightning when it breaketh forth is easy to be seen; and after the same manner the wind bloweth in every country.
6:62 And when God commandeth the clouds to go over the whole world, they do as they are bidden.
6:63 And the fire sent from above to consume hills and woods doeth as it is commanded: but these are like unto them neither in shew nor power.
6:64 Wherefore it is neither to be supposed nor said that they are gods, seeing, they are able neither to judge causes, nor to do good unto men.
6:65 Knowing therefore that they are no gods, fear them not,
6:66 For they can neither curse nor bless kings:
6:67 Neither can they shew signs in the heavens among the heathen, nor shine as the sun, nor give light as the moon.
6:68 The beasts are better than they: for they can get under a cover and help themselves.
6:69 It is then by no means manifest unto us that they are gods: therefore fear them not.
6:70 For as a scarecrow in a garden of cucumbers keepeth nothing: so are their gods of wood, and laid over with silver and gold.
6:71 And likewise their gods of wood, and laid over with silver and gold, are like to a white thorn in an orchard, that every bird sitteth upon; as also to a dead body, that is east into the dark.
6:72 And ye shall know them to be no gods by the bright purple that rotteth upon then1: and they themselves afterward shall be eaten, and shall be a reproach in the country.
6:73 Better therefore is the just man that hath none idols: for he shall be far from reproach.

Bell and the Dragon

Bell and the Dragon

Set apart from the beginning of Daniel, because it is not in the Hebrew, as neither the Narration of Bel and the Dragon.

Bel and the Dragon may speak to modern celebrative worship by "gods" who are about to get caught slipping into the pantry.

His various names in the Old and New Testaments demonstrate the various aspects in which he was regarded. Thus in Exodus he was named Ba`al-Tsephon, the god of the crypt. He was likewise named Seth or Sheth, signifying a pillar (phallus); and it was owing to these associations that he was considered a hidden god. Among the Ammonites, a people of East Palestine, he was known as Moloch (the king); at Tyre he was called Melcarth. The worship of Ba`al was introduced into Israel under Ahab, his wife being a Phoenician princess.

"Typhon, called Set, who was a great god in Egypt during the early dynasties, is an aspect of Baal and Ammon as also of Siva, Jehovah and other gods. Baal is the all-devouring Sun, in one sense, the fiery Moloch" As to the leaping of the prophets of Ba`al, mentioned in the Bible (1 Kings 18:26), Blavatsky writes: "It was simply a characteristic of the Sabean worship, for it denoted the motion of the planets round the sun. That the dance was a Bacchic frenzy is apparent. Sistra were used on the occasion"

The Destruction of Bel

1:1 And king Astyages was gathered to his fathers, and Cyrus of Persia received his kingdom.
1:2 And Daniel conversed with the king, and was honoured above all his friends.
1:3 Now the Babylons had an idol, called Bel, and there were spent upon him every day twelve great measures of fine flour, and forty sheep, and six vessels of wine.
1:4 And the king worshipped it and went daily to adore it: but Daniel worshipped his own God. And the king said unto him, Why dost not thou worship Bel?
1:5 Who answered and said, Because I may not worship idols made with hands, but the living God, who hath created the heaven and the earth, and hath sovereignty over all flesh.
1:6 Then said the king unto him, Thinkest thou not that Bel is a living God? seest thou not how much he eateth and drinketh every day?
1:7 Then Daniel smiled, and said, O king, be not deceived: for this is but clay within, and brass without, and did never eat or drink any thing.
1:8 So the king was wroth, and called for his priests, and said unto them, If ye tell me not who this is that devoureth these expences, ye shall die.
1:9 But if ye can certify me that Bel devoureth them, then Daniel shall die: for he hath spoken blasphemy against Bel. And Daniel said unto the king, Let it be according to thy word.
1:10 Now the priests of Bel were threescore and ten, beside their wives and children. And the king went with Daniel into the temple of Bel.
1:11 So Bel's priests said, Lo, we go out: but thou, O king, set on the meat, and make ready the wine, and shut the door fast and seal it with thine own signet;
1:12 And to morrow when thou comest in, if thou findest not that
0:0 that speaketh falsely against us.
1:13 And they little regarded it: for under the table they had made a privy entrance, whereby they entered in continually, and consumed those things.
1:14 So when they were gone forth, the king set meats before Bel. Now Daniel had commanded his servants to bring ashes, and those they strewed throughout all the temple in the presence of the king alone: then went they out, and shut the door, and sealed it with the king's signet, and so departed.
1:15 Now in the night came the priests with their wives and children, as they were wont to do, and did eat and drinck up all.
1:16 In the morning betime the king arose, and Daniel with him.
1:17 And the king said, Daniel, are the seals whole? And he said, Yea, O king, they be whole.
1:18 And as soon as he had opened the dour, the king looked upon the table, and cried with a loud voice, Great art thou, O Bel, and with thee is no deceit at all.
1:19 Then laughed Daniel, and held the king that he should not go in, and said, Behold now the pavement, and mark well whose footsteps are these.
1:20 And the king said, I see the footsteps of men, women, and children. And then the king was angry,
1:21 And took the priests with their wives and children, who shewed him the privy doors, where they came in, and consumed such things as were upon the table.
1:22 Therefore the king slew them, and delivered Bel into Daniel's power, who destroyed him and his temple.
1:23 And in that same place there was a great dragon, which they of Babylon worshipped.
1:24 And the king said unto Daniel, Wilt thou also say that this is of brass? lo, he liveth, he eateth and drinketh; thou canst not say that he is no living god: therefore worship him.
1:25 Then said Daniel unto the king, I will worship the Lord my God: for he is the living God.
1:26 But give me leave, O king, and I shall slay this dragon without sword or staff. The king said, I give thee leave.
1:27 Then Daniel took pitch, and fat, and hair, and did seethe them together, and made lumps thereof: this he put in the dragon's mouth, and so the dragon burst in sunder : and Daniel said, Lo, these are the gods ye worship.
1:28 When they of Babylon heard that, they took great indignation, and conspired against the king, saying, The king is become a Jew, and he hath destroyed Bel, he hath slain the dragon, and put the priests to death.
1:29 So they came to the king, and said, Deliver us Daniel, or else we will destroy thee and thine house.
1:30 Now when the king saw that they pressed him sore, being constrained, he delivered Daniel unto them:
1:31 Who cast him into the lions' den: where he was six days.
1:32 And in the den there were seven lions, and they had given them every day two carcases, and two sheep: which then were not given to them, to the intent they might devour Daniel.
1:33 Now there was in Jewry a prophet, called Habbacuc, who had made pottage, and had broken bread in a bowl, and was going into the field, for to bring it to the reapers.
1:34 But the angel of the Lord said unto Habbacuc, Go, carry the dinner that thou hast into Babylon unto Daniel, who is in the lions' den.
1:35 And Habbacuc said, Lord, I never saw Babylon; neither do I know where the den is.
1:36 Then the angel of the Lord took him by the crown, and bare him by the hair of his head, and through the vehemency of his spirit set him in Babylon over the den.
1:37 And Habbacuc cried, saying, O Daniel, Daniel, take the dinner which God hath sent thee.
1:38 And Daniel said, Thou hast remembered me, O God: neither hast thou forsaken them that seek thee and love thee.
1:39 So Daniel arose, and did eat: and the angel of the Lord set Habbacuc in his own place again immediately.
1:40 Upon the seventh day the king went to bewail Daniel: and when he came to the den, he looked in, and behold, Daniel was sitting.
1:41 Then cried the king with a loud voice, saying, Great art Lord God of Daniel, and there is none other beside thee.
1:42 And he drew him out, and cast those that were the cause of his destruction into the den: and they were devoured in a moment before his face.

Addition to Esther

Addition to Esther

chapter 10

10:4 Then Mardocheus said, God hath done these things.
10:5 For I remember a dream which I saw concerning these matters, and nothing thereof hath failed.
10:6 A little fountain became a river, and there was light, and the sun, and much water: this river is Esther, whom the king married, and made queen:
10:7 And the two dragons are I and Aman.
10:8 And the nations were those that were assembled to destroy the name of the Jews:
10:9 And my nation is this Israel, which cried to God, and were saved: for the Lord hath saved his people, and the Lord hath delivered us from all those evils, and God hath wrought signs and great wonders, which have not been done among the Gentiles.
10:10 Therefore hath he made two lots, one for the people of God, and another for all the Gentiles.
10:11 And these two lots came at the hour, and time, and day of judgment, before God among all nations.
10:12 So God remembered his people, and justified his inheritance.
10:13 Therefore those days shall be unto them in the month Adar, the fourteenth and fifteenth day of the same month, with an assembly, and joy, and with gladness before God, according to the generations for ever among his people.

chapter 11

11:1 In the fourth year of the reign of Ptolemeus and Cleopatra, Dositheus, who said he was a priest and Levite, and Ptolemeus his son, brought this epistle of Phurim, which they said was the same, and that Lysimachus the son of Ptolemeus, that was in Jerusalem, had interpreted it.
11:2 In the second year of the reign of Artexerxes the great, in the first day of the month Nisan, Mardocheus the son of Jairus, the son of Semei, the son of Cisai, of the tribe of Benjamin, had a dream;
11:3 Who was a Jew, and dwelt in the city of Susa, a great man, being a servitor in the king's court.
11:4 He was also one of the captives, which Nabuchodonosor the king of Babylon carried from Jerusalem with Jechonias king of Judea; and this was his dream:
11:5 Behold a noise of a tumult, with thunder, and earthquakes, and uproar in the land:
11:6 And, behold, two great dragons came forth ready to fight, and their cry was great.
11:7 And at their cry all nations were prepared to battle, that they might fight against the righteous people.
11:8 And lo a day of darkness and obscurity, tribulation and anguish, affliction and great uproar, upon earth.
11:9 And the whole righteous nation was troubled, fearing their own evils, and were ready to perish.
11:10 Then they cried unto God, and upon their cry, as it were from a little fountain, was made a great flood, even much water.
11:11 The light and the sun rose up, and the lowly were exalted, and devoured the glorious.
11:12 Now when Mardocheus, who had seen this dream, and what God had determined to do, was awake, he bare this dream in mind, and until night by all means was desirous to know it.

chapter 12

12:1 And Mardocheus took his rest in the court with Gabatha and Tharra, the two eunuchs of the king, and keepers of the palace.
12:2 And he heard their devices, and searched out their purposes, and learned that they were about to lay hands upon Artexerxes the king; and so he certified the king of them.
12:3 Then the king examined the two eunuchs, and after that they had confessed it, they were strangled.
12:4 And the king made a record of these things, and Mardocheus also wrote thereof.
12:5 So the king commanded, Mardocheus to serve in the court, and for this he rewarded him.
12:6 Howbeit Aman the son of Amadathus the Agagite, who was in great honour with the king, sought to molest Mardocheus and his people because of the two eunuchs of the king,

chapter 13

13:1 The copy of the letters was this: The great king Artexerxes writeth these things to the princes and governours that are under him from India unto Ethiopia in an hundred and seven and twenty provinces.
13:2 After that I became lord over many nations and had dominion over the whole world, not lifted up with presumption of my authority, but carrying myself always with equity and mildness, I purposed to settle my subjects continually in a quiet life, and making my kingdom peaceable, and open for passage to the utmost coasts, to renew peace, which is desired of all men.
13:3 Now when I asked my counsellors how this might be brought to pass, Aman, that excelled in wisdom among us, and was approved for his constant good will and steadfast fidelity, and had the honour of the second place in the kingdom,
13:4 Declared unto us, that in all nations throughout the world there was scattered a certain malicious people, that had laws contrary to ail nations, and continually despised the commandments of kings, so as the uniting of our kingdoms, honourably intended by us cannot go forward.
13:5 Seeing then we understand that this people alone is continually in opposition unto all men, differing in the strange manner of their laws, and evil affected to our state, working all the mischief they can that our kingdom may not be firmly established:
13:6 Therefore have we commanded, that all they that are signified in writing unto you by Aman, who is ordained over the affairs, and is next unto us, shall all, with their wives and children, be utterly destroyed by the sword of their enemies, without all mercy and pity, the fourteenth day of the twelfth month Adar of this present year:
13:7 That they, who of old and now also are malicious, may in one day with violence go into the grave, and so ever hereafter cause our affairs to be well settled, and without trouble.
13:8 Then Mardocheus thought upon all the works of the Lord, and made his prayer unto him,
13:9 Saying, O Lord, Lord, the King Almighty: for the whole world is in thy power, and if thou hast appointed to save Israel, there is no man that can gainsay thee:
13:10 For thou hast made heaven and earth, and all the wondrous things under the heaven.
13:11 Thou art Lord of all things, and and there is no man that can resist thee, which art the Lord.
13:12 Thou knowest all things, and thou knowest, Lord, that it was neither in contempt nor pride, nor for any desire of glory, that I did not bow down to proud Aman.
13:13 For I could have been content with good will for the salvation of Israel to kiss the soles of his feet.
13:14 But I did this, that I might not prefer the glory of man above the glory of God: neither will I worship any but thee, O God, neither will I do it in pride.
13:15 And now, O Lord God and King, spare thy people: for their eyes are upon us to bring us to nought; yea, they desire to destroy the inheritance, that hath been thine from the beginning.
13:16 Despise not the portion, which thou hast delivered out of Egypt for thine own self.
13:17 Hear my prayer, and be merciful unto thine inheritance: turn our sorrow into joy, that we may live, O Lord, and praise thy name: and destroy not the mouths of them that praise thee, O Lord.
13:18 All Israel in like manner cried most earnestly unto the Lord, because their death was before their eyes.

chapter 14

14:1 Queen Esther also, being in fear of death, resorted unto the Lord:
14:2 And laid away her glorious apparel, and put on the garments of anguish and mourning: and instead of precious ointments, she covered her head with ashes and dung, and she humbled her body greatly, and all the places of her joy she filled with her torn hair.
14:3 And she prayed unto the Lord God of Israel, saying, O my Lord, thou only art our King: help me, desolate woman, which have no helper but thee:
14:4 For my danger is in mine hand.
14:5 From my youth up I have heard in the tribe of my family that thou, O Lord, tookest Israel from among all people, and our fathers from all their predecessors, for a perpetual inheritance, and thou hast performed whatsoever thou didst promise them.
14:6 And now we have sinned before thee: therefore hast thou given us into the hands of our enemies,
14:7 Because we worshipped their gods: O Lord, thou art righteous.
14:8 Nevertheless it satisfieth them not, that we are in bitter captivity: but they have stricken hands with their idols,
14:9 That they will abolish the thing that thou with thy mouth hast ordained, and destroy thine inheritance, and stop the mouth of them that praise thee, and quench the glory of thy house, and of thine altar,
14:10 And open the mouths of the heathen to set forth the praises of the idols, and to magnify a fleshly king for ever.
14:11 O Lord, give not thy sceptre unto them that be nothing, and let them not laugh at our fall; but turn their device upon themselves, and make him an example, that hath begun this against us.
14:12 Remember, O Lord, make thyself known in time of our affliction, and give me boldness, O King of the nations, and Lord of all power.
14:13 Give me eloquent speech in my mouth before the lion: turn his heart to hate him that fighteth against us, that there may be an end of him, and of all that are likeminded to him:
14:14 But deliver us with thine hand, and help me that am desolate, and which have no other help but thee.
14:15 Thou knowest all things, O Lord; thou knowest that I hate the glory of the unrighteous, and abhor the bed of the uncircumcised, and of all the heathen.
14:16 Thou knowest my necessity: for I abhor the sign of my high estate, which is upon mine head in the days wherein I shew myself, and that I abhor it as a menstruous rag, and that I wear it not when I am private by myself.
14:17 And that thine handmaid hath not eaten at Aman's table, and that I have not greatly esteemed the king's feast, nor drunk the wine of the drink offerings.
14:18 Neither had thine handmaid any joy since the day that I was brought hither to this present, but in thee, O Lord God of Abraham.
14:19 O thou mighty God above all, hear the voice of the forlorn and deliver us out of the hands of the mischievous, and deliver me out of my fear.

chapter 15

15:1 And upon the third day, when she had ended her prayers, she laid away her mourning garments, and put on her glorious apparel.
15:2 And being gloriously adorned, after she had called upon God, who is the beholder and saviour of all things, she took two maids with her:
15:3 And upon the one she leaned, as carrying herself daintily;
15:4 And the other followed, bearing up her train.
15:5 And she was ruddy through the perfection of her beauty, and her countenance was cheerful and very amiable: but her heart was in anguish for fear.
15:6 Then having passed through all the doors, she stood before the king, who sat upon his royal throne, and was clothed with all his robes of majesty, all glittering with gold and precious stones; and he was very dreadful.
15:7 Then lifting up his countenance that shone with majesty, he looked very fiercely upon her: and the queen fell down, and was pale, and fainted, and bowed herself upon the head of the maid that went before her.
15:8 Then God changed the spirit of the king into mildness, who in a fear leaped from his throne, and took her in his arms, till she came to herself again, and comforted her with loving words and said unto her,
15:9 Esther, what is the matter? I am thy brother, be of good cheer:
15:10 Thou shalt not die, though our our commandment be general: come near.
15:11 And so be held up his golden sceptre, and laid it upon her neck,
15:12 And embraced her, and said, Speak unto me.
15:13 Then said she unto him, I saw thee, my lord, as an angel of God, and my heart was troubled for fear of thy majesty.
15:14 For wonderful art thou, lord, and thy countenance is full of grace.
15:15 And as she was speaking, she fell down for faintness.
15:16 Then the king was troubled, and ail his servants comforted her.

chapter 16

16:1 The great king Artexerxes unto the princes and governors of an hundred and seven and twenty provinces from India unto Ethiopia, and unto all our faithful subjects, greeting.
16:2 Many, the more often they are honoured with the great bounty of their gracious princes, the more proud they are waxen,
16:3 And endeavour to hurt not our subjects only, but not being able to bear abundance, do take in hand to practise also against those that do them good:
16:4 And take not only thankfulness away from among men, but also lifted up with the glorious words of lewd persons, that were never good, they think to escape the justice of God, that seeth all things and hateth evil.
16:5 Oftentimes also fair speech of those, that are put in trust to manage their friends' affairs, hath caused many that are in authority to be partakers of innocent blood, and hath enwrapped them in remediless calamities:
16:6 Beguiling with the falsehood and deceit of their lewd disposition the innocency and goodness of princes.
16:7 Now ye may see this, as we have declared, not so much by ancient histories, as ye may, if ye search what hath been wickedly done of late through the pestilent behaviour of them that are unworthily placed in authority.
16:8 And we must take care for the time to come, that our kingdom may be quiet and peaceable for all men,
16:9 Both by changing our purposes, and always judging things that are evident with more equal proceeding.
16:10 For Aman, a Macedonian, the son of Amadatha, being indeed a stranger from the Persian blood, and far distant from our goodness, and as a stranger received of us,
16:11 Had so far forth obtained the favour that we shew toward every nation, as that he was called our father, and was continually honoured of all the next person unto the king.
16:12 But he, not bearing his great dignity, went about to deprive us of our kingdom and life:
16:13 Having by manifold and cunning deceits sought of us the destruction, as well of Mardocheus, who saved our life, and continually procured our good, as also of blameless Esther, partaker of our kingdom, with their whole nation.
16:14 For by these means he thought, finding us destitute of friends to have translated the kingdom of the Persians to the Macedonians.
16:15 But we find that the Jews, whom this wicked wretch hath delivered to utter destruction, are no evildoers, but live by most just laws:
16:16 And that they be children of the most high and most mighty, living God, who hath ordered the kingdom both unto us and to our progenitors in the most excellent manner.
16:17 Wherefore ye shall do well not to put in execution the letters sent unto you by Aman the son of Amadatha.
16:18 For he that was the worker of these things, is hanged at the gates of Susa with all his family: God, who ruleth all things, speedily rendering vengeance to him according to his deserts.
16:19 Therefore ye shall publish the copy of this letter in all places, that the Jews may freely live after their own laws.
16:20 And ye shall aid them, that even the same day, being the thirteenth day of the twelfth month Adar, they may be avenged on them, who in the time of their affliction shall set upon them.
16:21 For Almighty God hath turned to joy unto them the day, wherein the chosen people should have perished.
16:22 Ye shall therefore among your solemn feasts keep it an high day with all feasting:
16:23 That both now and hereafter there may be safety to us and the well affected Persians; but to those which do conspire against us a memorial of destruction.
16:24 Therefore every city and country whatsoever, which shall not do according to these things, shall be destroyed without mercy with fire and sword, and shall be made not only unpassable for men, but also most hateful to wild beasts and fowls for ever.

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